American Indian Graduate Center Receives $5000 Grant from Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community to Support the American Indian Business Leaders Scholarship Fund

American Indian Graduate Center Receives Grant

AIGC will use the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community grant to provide scholarships to Native American business students. 

Albuquerque, New Mexico

The American Indian Graduate Center announced a $5000 grant received from the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community today. The grant will be used to support the recently endowed American Indian Business Leaders scholarship.

The $50,000 AIBL Founders Scholarship was created as a permanent tribute to honor the dedication and support of the three founding board members, Dave Archambault, Dr. Joe McDonald and Dr. Larry Gianchetta, who have served AIBL since its creation in 1994. The annual scholarship will be for AIBL business students with a GPA of 2.5 or higher who demonstrate leadership skills, cultural involvement and community service.

“AIGC is thrilled that the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community has contributed to this new and exciting scholarship fund,” stated Angelique Albert, AIGC Executive Director. “These funds will provide valuable opportunities to deserving Native business students and will continue the AIGC legacy of supporting emerging Native American leaders.”

The AIBL Founders Scholarship will be administered by the American Indian Graduate Center based in Albuquerque, NM.  AIGC and AIGC Scholars are the largest scholarship providers to American Indian and Alaskan Native students in the United States, providing more than $200 million since its inception in 1969. AIGC awards $15 million annually to deserving undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate students.

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The American Indian Graduate Center Welcomes New COO, Marvis Vallo

As the Chief Operations Officer, Marvis Vallo brings over a decade of finance and business management experience to the American Indian Graduate Center.

 Albuquerque, New Mexico

Marvis Vallo (Pueblo of Acoma) has joined the American Indian Graduate Center as the Chief Operating Officer. Vallo previously served as the Financial Controller for the Pueblo of Acoma and brings over a decade of finance and managerial experience to AIGC. Having served as the chairman of the pueblo’s pension committee and a member of its investment committee, Vallo doubled the pueblo’s investment holdings and gained valuable insight into tribal-governmental relations. His wealth of experience and financial acumen will serve AIGC immediately and long term, as Marvis sees funding as a major challenge facing Native students.

In its 50th year, AIGC is looking to continue its legacy of being the nation’s largest scholarship provider to American Indian students. Angelique Albert, the center’s executive director, stated that Vallo embodies all of the values that contribute to AIGC’s continued success. “Marvis Vallo is a leader who sees and complements the AIGC vision for the next half century. At the same time, he holds a deep respect for the legacy of the past 50 years. This unity of values is exactly what AIGC needs, and Marvis brings a vitality to the organization that will keep us moving forward.”

As he embarks on a new journey with the American Indian Graduate Center, Vallo is excited to delve into the world of higher education by securing ways to provide support to American Indian students. “Providing financial support through scholarships is crucial for Native American students. As the national leader in this capacity, AIGC has an important platform which we can use to tell their stories and build partnerships to create even more opportunities for education and success,” said Vallo. In addition to his new role with AIGC, Vallo has been appointed to the board of the University of New Mexico’s Anderson Foundation, which supports the university’s business school. Marvis Vallo is a wonderful addition to the AIGC team and an invaluable leader in Indian Country.

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The American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC) is in search of a Development Officer

AIGC is hiring

Development Officer

Position Summary

Under direct supervision of the Development Director, the Development Officer will manage a portfolio of 60+ major donors and prospects.  The portfolio will consist of individuals, corporations, foundations, tribes and Native organizations. The Development Officer will team with the Development Director and Executive Director to ensure that AIGC has the resources it needs to fulfill its mission.

The DO will spend a significant amount of time in direct interaction with individual donors, tribal leaders, corporate executives, foundation program officers and other decision makers. The DO must be comfortable and confident engaging at the highest levels, and adept at influencing opinion and securing commitments.  The position requires the ability analyze progress and make necessary adjustments throughout the cultivation process.

The DO will be based in AIGC’s office in Albuquerque, and the position will require regular travel throughout the United States.

Qualifications

A strong candidate will have experience of five or more years in fundraising or other experience that demonstrates tenacity, creativity, follow-through and strong relationship-building skills. A Bachelor’s Degree required and a Master’s Degree is preferred or equivalent combination of education and experience. Familiarity with Raiser’s Edge database is a plus. Native American strongly preferred and desired.

Pay Range

Starting Salary $55,000- $60,000

Click here to read the complete Development Officer job description.

Please submit your letter of interest and resume to morgan@aigcs.org

American Indian Graduate Center, the largest Native American scholarship provider in the nation with 50 years of service to Native scholars is saddened and disappointed by the recent Colorado State University incident and questions-

Angelique Albert

Are schools doing all that is necessary to protect and affirm Native students, or are they merely accepting their tuition dollars?

(Albuquerque, New Mexico-May 8th, 2018)– Last week at Colorado State University, two young Native American brothers were stopped and questioned by university police while attending a campus tour as a result of a call made by a suspicious parent. As the largest Native American scholarship provider in the nation and with 50 years of that legacy, we at the American Indian Graduate Center are deeply saddened and disappointed that this incident occurred. We extend our full support to the young men and their mother and genuinely hope that they are receiving the appropriate remedy for their hardship.

An incident such as this is not isolated. It is a direct reflection of the racism and discrimination experienced by Native American students and other students of color every day on campuses across the United States. Every day, our young Black and Brown scholars are questioned, doubted, and threatened simply for their racial and ethnic backgrounds. It is a frustrating reality that college campuses where we send our children to live what are supposed to be the best years of their lives- are far from immune to the difficulties and trauma of racism.

As a resource for Native scholars, we want to communicate that Native students should not be subjected to higher scrutiny and suspicion for the simple act of existing. We want to challenge colleges across the country to consider how all of their policies affect students of color. Too often, racist views and actions- like the call that pointed out two innocent Native men on that campus tour- do not face repercussions and consequences while the affected parties must deal with the trauma and humiliation caused by such incidents. We hope that Colorado State University will take the lead in making sure that Native students are never again subjected to such a blatant disregard for their rights.

The American Indian Graduate Center takes seriously its role as a partner to Native students. We stand committed to pursuing equality in access and opportunity for our scholars across the nation. As we support our Native youth going into college, we hope that universities will work with us in ensuring the safety and well-being of our students. We have provided $2 million in scholarships for students at Colorado State University alone and this incident leads us to ask- are schools doing all that is necessary to protect and affirm Native students, or are they merely accepting their tuition dollars?

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3701 San Mateo Blvd NE #200  Albuquerque, NM 87110
Phone: 505-881-4584  Toll Free: 800-628-1920
Email: web@aigcs.org   https://www.aigcs.org/

American Indian Graduate Center’s 2017 Students of The Year

“Making the Grad” campaign designed to showcase elite scholars

the “Making the Grad” campaign designed to showcase elite scholarsAMERICAN INDIAN GRADUATE CENTER’S 2017 STUDENTS OF THE YEAR AT NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING ASSOCIATION TRADESHOW AND CON-VENTION

LAS VEGAS, NV (April 20, 2018) – The American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC) has announced the inaugural selections for the “Making the Grad” campaign designed to showcase elite scholars. Brook Thompson (undergraduate) and Rebecca St Germaine (graduate) were selected as AIGC 2017 Students of the Year.

“We are thrilled to have such an impressive alumni presence across Indian Country. Brook and Rebecca are the epitome of why AIGC was established; to empower leaders in all sectors across this country,” said Angelique Albert, Executive Director of AIGC.

The theme of the event centered around education and leadership. NIGA Chairman and AIGC board member Ernie Stevens Jr. said of the event, “These leaders are not future leaders, they are leaders of today and we need to see them as such”.

Brook Thompson, a citizen of the Yurok Tribe of Northern California, is currently a civil engineering major at Portland State University. She is concurrently enrolled in political science courses at George Washington University. Brook is also a current intern in Washington D.C. at the Sen-ate Committee on Indian Affairs. In addition, Brook grew up with traditional brush dance, weaving small baskets, beading, gathering traditional foods and learning Yurok. Brook hopes to improve her tribes’ sustainability and infrastructure through her degree in civil engineering. She also plans to receive her Ph.D. in civil engineering and sit on her tribal council.

Dr. Rebecca St Germaine, a citizen of the Wisconsin Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe Nation, is a recent graduate of the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy. She is a contributing author in various publications in pharmaceutical outcomes research. Dr. St Germaine draws from her tribal background to better understand the cultural health beliefs of other indigenous nations to provide continuing education to medical staff that train in cultural competencies. In addition, she serves as the Indian Health Board Chairwoman. Dr. St Germaine’s de-sire is to continue to improve recognition of cultural health belief constructs for rural populations in underserved areas.

AIGC is the largest scholarship provider to American Indian and Alaska Native students. For nearly 50 years, we have empowered tribal students from 400 tribes in all 50 states. AIGC funds undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees in any field at any institution of choice. AIGC is the scholarship center for Native students.

Attached – AIGC photo by Christian Purdie

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AIGC/ AIGC Scholars has awarded more than $200 million in scholarships since 1969. We are proud to empower tribal students from 400 tribes in 50 states through educational funding and support services.

3701 San Mateo Blvd NE #200 Albuquerque, NM 87110

Phone: 505-881-4584
Toll Free: 800-628-1920

AIBL Honors Founders’ Legacy for Training Native Business Leaders

AIBL Founders Larry Gianchetta, Dave Archambault with Angelique Albert, Ernie Stevens, Prairie Bighorn

American Indian Business Leaders (AIBL) honored its founding members on Saturday, April 28, 2018 PHOENIX  (May 1, 2018) – At the close of its annual leadership conference, American Indian Business Leaders (AIBL) honored its founding members on Saturday, April 28, 2018 by creating the AIBL Founders Scholarship. The endowment was established to honor Dave Archambault, Dr. Joe McDonald and Dr. Larry Gianchetta for their 24 years of dedication to empowering tribal business students.

“We are proud to announce a new scholarship endowment honoring the founders of the national organization, American Indian Business Leaders,” said AIBL Executive Director Prairie Bighorn. “One of the greatest needs our students have is scholarships. To be able to honor our founding board members and provide funding for our students is a win for all of us. AIBL is excited to partner with the AIGC team on this project!”

The $50,000 AIBL Founders Scholarship was created as a permanent tribute to honor the dedication and support of the three founding board members who have served AIBL since its creation in 1994. The annual scholarship will be for AIBL business students with a GPA of 2.5 or higher who demonstrate leadership skills, cultural involvement and community service.

The AIBL Founders Scholarship will be administered by the American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC) based in Albuquerque, NM.  AIGC and AIGC Scholars are the largest scholarship providers to American Indian and Alaskan Native students in the United States, providing more than $200 million since its inception in 1969. AIGC awards $15 million annually to deserving undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate students. https://www.aigcs.org/

“These men are not only the founding board members of AIBL but also are three of the most influential leaders in tribal business education,” said Angelique Albert, AIGC Executive Director. “They have forged the way for many students, and through this endowment their legacy will continue to give to students into perpetuity.”

The AIBL Founders Scholarship was established with seed money from a golf tournament, a generous donation from Salish Kootenai College, and individual donations to honor these respected founders for their work while creating scholarship opportunities for current business students. The endowment was started with $17,500 and will be fully endowed once it reaches $50,000; donors are still welcome to contribute through AIGC.

Speaking to hundreds of business students and leaders at the AIBL awards ceremony, National Indian Gaming Association Chairman Ernie Stevens, Jr. said, “It was a great honor to speak to these powerful young business leaders. We enjoyed a lot of good discussions centering around historical roles in leadership and being a warrior in business. I called on them to help educate America about the strength of our people and to encourage their peers down this path of leadership.”

For AIBL’s three founding members, the announcement of the endowed scholarship was a complete surprise. Dave Archambault said he wondered why his family from North Dakota suddenly appeared at the awards dinner.

“It is a very special honoring for me,” Archambault said. “AIBL is an organization that I really believe in. It’s an answer to poverty on reservations by training and invigorating the youth with business knowledge and development. I wrote the original ANA grant to start AIBL formally as a national organization. It has been a real struggle in the past to keep us going and we all have Larry Gianchetta to thank for finding us financing. My reward is seeing the student ideas and competition.”

Dr. Larry Gianchetta said, “I am delighted that this fund has been set up to help Native business students! It is an honor to have worked with Joe and Dave over the last 24 years to support the AIBL organization and our students.”

The American Indian Business Leaders organization was founded in 1994 with the goal of increasing the representation of American Indians and Alaska Natives in business and entrepreneurial ventures through education and leadership development opportunities. AIBL’s vision over the next decade is to become the pre-eminent national non-profit organization serving American Indians and Alaska Natives by providing business and entrepreneurship education, leadership development training, and the necessary support to help young men and women who aspire to pursue studies and careers in business, entrepreneurship, or related disciplines. http://www.aibl.org/

Bios for board members can be found at: http://www.aibl.org/lheadership/board-members

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Photo credit:  Joshua Tso

1 – American Indian Business Leaders founding board members Dr. Larry Gianchetta, Dave Archambault and Dr. Joe McDonald (not pictured) were honored by the establishment of $50,000 AIBL Founders Scholarship to honor their 24 years of service empowering Native business students. (l to r), AIBL Executive Director Prairie Bighorn, Dr. Larry Gianchetta, Dave Archambault, and AIGC Executive Director Angelique Albert.

2 – AIGC Executive Director Angelique Albert, National Indian Gaming Association Chairman Ernie Stevens, Sr. (second from right) and AIBL Executive Director Prairie Bighorn (far right) congratulate Dr. Larry Gianchetta and Dave Archambault on the AIBL Founders Scholarship created to honor them.

 

3701 San Mateo Blvd NE #200  Albuquerque, NM 87110
Phone: 505-881-4584
Toll Free: 800-628-1920
Email: web@aigcs.org
Website: https://www.aigcs.org/

AIGC Director Appointed to Obama Foundation MBK Advisory Council

Attached - Angelique Albert photo by Don James Angelique Albert appointed to My Brother’s Keeper Alliance Advisory Council
AIGC Executive Director joins business, academic leaders on Obama Foundation Initiative

ALBUQUERQUE, NM (March 28, 2018) –  My Brother’s Keeper Alliance, an initiative of the Obama Foundation, has announced its new Advisory Council with the appointment of five new members including Angelique Albert, Executive Director, American Indian Graduate Center.

“We are thrilled to have such an impressive group of business and academic leaders join the My Brother’s Keeper Alliance’s Advisory Council. Their commitment to this work in their respective industries and communities makes each a great addition at such an important time,” said David Simas, CEO of the Obama Foundation.

President Obama launched My Brother’s Keeper in 2014 to address persistent opportunity gaps facing boys and young men of color and to ensure opportunities to reach their full potential. In 2015, the MBK Alliance was launched, then later became an initiative of the Obama Foundation focused on building safe and supportive communities for boys and young men of color where they feel valued and have pathways to opportunity.

“We’re very proud of Angelique’s appointment to the Advisory Council,” said AIGC Board President Holly Cook Macarro. “Her national work with My Brother’s Keeper Alliance will help expand AIGC’s mission to provide support for American Indian and Alaskan Natives seeking higher education and to help close opportunity gaps facing boys and young men of color.”

Albert, a citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, said, “I am extremely humbled to contribute a Native voice and perspective to this amazing organization and its critical mission. More importantly, I am honored to assist in creating pathways for our young men and boys who are deserving of every opportunity this life can provide them.”

Albert noted that AIGC and AIGC Scholars are the largest scholarship providers to American Indian and Alaskan Native students in the United States, providing more than $200 million since its inception in 1969. The organization awards $15 million annually to deserving undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate students.

“We’re so proud to empower tribal students from 400 tribes in all 50 states,” said Albert. “The graduation rate for our AIGC Scholars program is 69 percent. Our Science Post Graduate Scholarship Fund — targeting engineering, pharmacy and environmental sciences — has a 95 percent graduation rate! And 66 percent of SPGSF graduates are Native women. We’re leading the way, but we’re far behind in meeting the national need for scholarships.”

Albert said this appointment will give tribal communities a stronger voice and larger presence in My Brother’s Keeper initiatives. “President Obama’s priorities for our young men are safety and mentorships. I believe education is key to making positive change, and we’re constantly seeking more funding to increase our scholarships. But mentoring and internships are essential for job placement and creating career paths, so we plan to connect our 49 years of alumni with more students.”   

Albert joined the American Indian Graduate Center as Executive Director in March 2017. She has dedicated her professional career in service to tribal communities and creating positive impacts. Prior to her work at AIGC, Albert served as Executive Director of Salish Kootenai College Foundation where she was instrumental in planning and implementing the successful launch of a $20 million capital campaign. She also served as Associate Director of National American Indian Business Leaders and in various roles in philanthropy, including Lead Native American Program Officer for the Beaumont Foundation of America, and External Grant Reviewer for the Case Foundation. Albert’s early career began by serving her own tribe as a Legal Intern, Court Appointed Special Advocate, and Chief Juvenile Probation Officer.

Albert served as a board member for the Potlatch Fund, a Native-led nonprofit that provides grants and leadership development in Tribal communities throughout Washington, Idaho, Oregon and Montana. Albert also served on the board of S & K Gaming, LLC, one of the corporations owned by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. She holds a B.A. in Human Services and an MBA with a special emphasis in American Indian Entrepreneurship from Gonzaga University.

Albert joins Tom Geddes, CEO of Plank Industries, Karol Mason, President, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and young adult members Malachi Hernandez and Senegal Mabry. Council members provide strategic guidance to MBK Alliance programs and serve as ambassadors in their respective industries and communities.  https://www.obama.org/updates/mbka-advisory/ 

Attached – Angelique Albert photo by Don James

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AIGC/ AIGC Scholars has awarded more than $200 million in scholarships since 1969. We are proud to empower tribal students from 400 tribes in 50 states through educational funding and support services.

3701 San Mateo Blvd NE #200  Albuquerque, NM 87110 Phone: 505-881-4584  Toll Free: 800-628-1920

Email: web@aigcs.org   https://www.aigcs.org/

AIGC Board President Nationally Recognized

August 3, 2017

Contact: Stephine Poston (505) 379-6172; stephposton@msn.com

American Indian Graduate Center Board President Nationally Recognized

Holly Cook Macarro Honored at Women Empowering Women for Indian Nations (WEWIN)

Isleta Pueblo, NM – August 3, 2017 – The American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC) congratulates Board President, Holly Cook Macarro (Red Lake Band of Ojibwe) who was honored this week by Women Empowering Women for Indian Nations (WEWIN), a national organization committed to leadership, tribal culture, community and family.

“President Cook-Macarro is a tremendous leader and advocate in Indian Country.  She has been instrumental in taking AIGC to the next level of service and scholarships for our students. I am extremely proud of her, she is an inspiration to native women and tribal people across this country.  I cannot think of a more deserving person of the prestigious recognition,” stated Angelique Albert, AIGC’s Executive Director.

Cook Macarro is a graduate of the University of North Dakota with BBA and University of St. Thomas (St. Paul, MN) with an MBA.  She has a successful track record of orchestrating outreach voter empowerment campaigns for federal elections, as well as advocating for various tribal issues including playing a key role in the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act.

The AIGC Board of Directors also includes Joel Frank (Vice President)/Seminole Tribe of Florida, Steve Stallings (Secretary-Treasurer)/Rincon Band of Luiseno Indians, Stacy Leeds/Cherokee, Danna Jackson/Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Walter Lamar/Blackfeet, Wichita, Dana Arviso/ Diné, Ernie L. Stevens Jr./ Oneida Nation and Aurene Martin/Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa.

About the American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC)

AIGC and AIGC Scholars is the largest scholarship provider to American Indian and Alaska Native graduate and undergraduate students in the United States.  AIGC and AIGC Scholars have funded over 13,000 students and awarded over $200 million in scholarships since inception.

Building on a 50-year legacy, AIGC will continue to be the premier national resource in funding and empowering the next generation of Native leaders across all sectors, by meeting the unmet need of every Native American student.

American Indian Graduate Center, Inc.
3701 San Mateo NE, Suite 200, Albuquerque, NM 87110
(505) 881-4584 www.aigcs.org

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American Indian Graduate Center Names New Board President

Holly Cook Macarro Will Lead National Native Scholarship Organization

 Holly Cook Macarro & Rose Graham Photo, left to right: Holly Cook Macarro & Rose Graham.

Albuquerque, NM – May 30, 2017 – The American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC) recently elected Holly Cook Macarro (Red Lake Band of Ojibwe) President of the organization’s Board of Directors.

Cook Macarro is a graduate of the University of North Dakota with BBA and University of St. Thomas (St. Paul, MN) with an MBA.  She has a successful track record of orchestrating outreach voter empowerment campaigns for federal elections, as well as advocating for various tribal issues including playing a key role in the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act.

“First, thank you to our outgoing President Rose Graham (Navajo) for her steady leadership and service to our organization,” stated Angelique Albert, AIGC’s Executive Director.  “Holly Cook Macarro will bring a wealth of expertise and knowledge as we strengthen our fundraising efforts to provide more undergraduate and graduate scholarships,” added Albert.

Cook Macarro stated, “It’s an exciting time for AIGC.  We have a nearly 50-year legacy of providing higher education scholarships and services to Indian students to build upon.  As we move toward this important anniversary milestone, our mission is to continue to encourage Native students to pursue higher education and to be ready with scholarships that meet their needs.”

The AIGC Board Vice President is Joel Frank and Secretary-Treasurer is Steve Stallings.  Continuing Board Members at Large this year are Stacy Leeds (Cherokee), Danna Jackson (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes), Walter Lamar (Blackfeet, Wichita) and Dana Arviso (Diné).  Newly elected to the Board of Directors is Aurene Martin (Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa), President of Spirit Rock Consulting Incorporated.  She has extensive experience in Federal Indian Law and Policy, having served in several Tribal and Federal key government positions.

About the American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC)

AIGC is a national organization, based in Albuquerque, NM, providing educational support through scholarships since 1969. AIGC is a national provider of scholarships for American Indian and Alaska Native graduate and undergraduate students.  AIGC Scholars is the American Indian and Alaska Native partner in the Bill and Melinda Gates Scholars Program.   AIGC and AIGC Scholars have funded almost 13,000 students and awarded nearly $200 million in scholarships since inception.

Building on a 50-year legacy, AIGC will continue to be the premier national resource in funding and empowering the next generation of Native leaders across all sectors, by meeting the unmet need of every Native American student.

American Indian Graduate Center, Inc.
3701 San Mateo NE, Suite 200, Albuquerque, NM 87110
(505) 881-4584 | www.aigcs.org